Showing posts tagged with “social media”

npr:

This was our first Snapchat. We’re nprnews over there. What do you think?

From a social media standpoint, I think it’s really interesting that NPR is using Snapchat as a public-facing platform through their new Stories function. It’s charming in a low-fi, “authentic” way, but I just don’t think I could really get behind my own brands using it in this way. Thoughts? 

Instagram isn’t about reality – it’s about a well-crafted fantasy, a highlights reel of your life that shows off versions of yourself that you want to remember and put on display in a glass case for other people to admire and browse through.

Video, at least the amateurish footage I shot, is the antithesis of that fantasy.

Instagram Video and the Death of Fantasy

The company promises to complete a review of its community standards on hate speech, update training for the staff that review harmful content, increase accountability for the creators of the content, and establish new partnerships with women’s rights groups. Additionally, Facebook will encourage international anti-defamation groups it works with to include women’s groups in their conversations.

BREAKING: Facebook Promises To Take Action On Domestic Violence Content

Good first step, now to see if they actually carry out these actions and continue holding them to account. 


Last week, activists launched a campaign that urged companies to boycott Facebook advertising because the social media network allows users to post images of domestic violence against women, while banning advertisements about women’s health. More than a dozen companies have pulled their advertising as a result, including online bank Nationwide UK, Nissan UK, and J Street.
13 Companies Drop Facebook Advertising Over Domestic Violence Content

This pleases me greatly. Other companies, please follow suit until Facebook modifies its absurd policies on what constitutes appropriate advertising content. 

Last week, activists launched a campaign that urged companies to boycott Facebook advertising because the social media network allows users to post images of domestic violence against women, while banning advertisements about women’s health. More than a dozen companies have pulled their advertising as a result, including online bank Nationwide UK, Nissan UK, and J Street.

13 Companies Drop Facebook Advertising Over Domestic Violence Content

This pleases me greatly. Other companies, please follow suit until Facebook modifies its absurd policies on what constitutes appropriate advertising content. 

I’ve been meaning to write a media-focused analysis of the election results for the last few days but I can’t bring myself to do it.

Maybe later tonight. 

One of the more interesting things to observe in the latest round of skirmishing about political advertising has been the effort to find out if parties are paying to place their ads on mainstream TV networks. Members of the Twitterverse are asked to report if they’ve seen the anti-Trudeau ad and the anti-anti-Trudeau ad on actual TV, instead of “just on the Internet.”

Today, traditional TV platforms still account for the largest proportion of overall advertising dollars, but the gap is narrowing. In politics, the smartest campaigners are thinking not about how they can raise the millions they need to pump into TV ads for 37 days in 2015, but how they can target the right hearts and minds with potent, cost effective and money raising online advertising, starting right now.

In Twitter age, attack ads don’t need to air on TV any more

Bookmarked more for personal reading: I’m interested in continuing to track the effectiveness and dissemination of attack ads, particularly through social media and amplified through the echo chamber effect.