Showing posts tagged with “feminism”

nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.

nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.

The female characters we tend to applaud typically adhere to a particular formula for strength, one that breaks the patriarchal mold of how a woman should behave. This can be empowering, but the constant regurgitation of this one type of “strong female character” limits the kind of women we value on screen and dismisses the merits of those who prove themselves in a different way. Male characters aren’t confined by the same standards, and more stereotypically “feminine” traits like patience, kindness and adaptability shouldn’t be seen as inherently lesser than more “masculine” ones like physical strength or the ability to lead an army into battle.

Why Sansa Stark Is the Strongest Character on ‘Game of Thrones’

I wouldn’t call her the strongest character, but she definitely deserves more props than she currently does.

Most men never think about patriarchy—what it means, how it is created and sustained. Many men in our nation would not be able to spell the word or pronounce it correctly. The word “patriarchy” just is not a part of their normal everyday thought or speech. Men who have heard and know the word usually associate it with women’s liberation, with feminism, and therefore dismiss it as irrelevant to their own experiences. I have been standing at podiums talking about patriarchy for more than thirty years. It is a word I use daily, and men who hear me use it often ask me what I mean by it.

Nothing discounts the old antifeminist projection of men as all-powerful more than their basic ignorance of a major facet of the political system that shapes and informs male identity and sense of self from birth until death.

—bell hooks, “Understanding Patriachy”

(Source: heteroglossia)

White feminism is a set of beliefs that allows for the exclusion of issues that specifically affect women of colour. It is “one size-fits all” feminism, where middle class white women are the mould that others must fit. It is a method of practicing feminism, not an indictment of every individual white feminist, everywhere, always.

— ninajacate, This Is What I Mean When I Say “White Feminism”

Girls are trained to say, ‘I wrote this, but it’s probably really stupid.’ Well, no, you wouldn’t write a novel if you thought it was really stupid. Men are much more comfortable going, ‘I wrote this book because I have a unique perspective that the world needs to hear.’ Girls are taught from the age of seven that if you get a compliment, you don’t go, ‘Thank you’, you go, ‘No, you’re insane.’

—Lena Dunham 

(Source: reshmarambles)

stankface:

Nichelle Nichols inspires Whoopi Goldberg to become an actress because she was the first black woman Whoopi’d ever seen on tv that wasn’t playing a maid.

Whoopi gets her career launched by starring in The Color Purple.

Lupita Nyong’o was inspired to become an actress after watching The Color Purple because she was finally watching a film with people who looked like her.

So just to be clear, An African communications officer (who Nichelle never would’ve played if not for MLKJ encouraging her about representation) inspired the lead actress in the best black film of all time (which was based off a book written by a black womanist) where the women carried the weight of the film, which led to an African actress to get the role in a high profile film, directed, written by and starring black folk before even graduating school and now has the most nominations I’ve ever seen from someone so inexperienced.

But by all means, keep making racist powerpoints about how representation has no affect on anyone just because you don’t see color.

adventuresofcesium:

on one hand feminism does help men but on the other hand i want men to finally get it through their heads that a social movement doesn’t have to be aimed at benefiting them to be worthwhile

(Source: angrybisexualcesium)

seekingwillow:

I think the thing I adore/enjoy the most about Nicki Minaj is that time and time again, almost any and everywhere she can? She makes it clear that her actions are NOT for the male gaze. The male gaze gets no peace from Nicki Minaj; she disrupts it constantly. She disrupts their fantasy. She disrupts the ability to ignore and project onto her - cause she’s not going to be the same one moment to the next, far less one song to the next.
Nicki Minaj lives and breathes radical presence as a woman, a WoC, being whole and not one dimensional; forcing herself out of projected molds and it is AWESOME.

seekingwillow:

I think the thing I adore/enjoy the most about Nicki Minaj is that time and time again, almost any and everywhere she can? She makes it clear that her actions are NOT for the male gaze. The male gaze gets no peace from Nicki Minaj; she disrupts it constantly. She disrupts their fantasy. She disrupts the ability to ignore and project onto her - cause she’s not going to be the same one moment to the next, far less one song to the next.

Nicki Minaj lives and breathes radical presence as a woman, a WoC, being whole and not one dimensional; forcing herself out of projected molds and it is AWESOME.

(Source: allnicki)

In our celebrity-obsessed world, having one star unreservedly state that equality is the work of both men and women, that it’s not just about raising daughters to be strong but about bringing up sons to be respectful, is worth at least a year’s worth of opiniony liberal think pieces in impact. Beyoncé’s endorsement says that equality is still something to be fought for; and that it’s an ideal that isn’t, in fact, “extreme.” Instead, it’s as appealing, as right and as hopeful as a hit song.

Beyoncé takes a stand against sexism

How much do I love that Beyoncé is using her influence to actually talk about feminism and equality? Amazing. 

(Source: veganmenna)