I always find it funny that those who tell us "why label yourself" have no problem labeling themselves either gay or straight

—Troy Brooks in comment to a Huffington Post Live segment (Do We Need Science To Prove Bisexuality?) 28 March 2014 (via bisexual-community)

Abortion has been set up in its own special category by conservative male legislators in this country. I am forced to support corporate welfare, Creationist schools and immoral wars with my tax dollars. But for some reason my conservative neighbor doesn’t have to support abortion rights with his tax dollars. And if Hobby Lobby gets their way, my conservative neighbor will be able to pay any potential employees differently based on whether they use birth control.
 
That’s not justice. If this country wants to move in that direction, then perhaps progressives nationally should reorganize into a “religion.” Sounds like a pretty cool perk: organize politically without the pesky IRS, and enshrine a bunch of political beliefs into a discriminatory legal code. But somehow I don’t think the Supreme Court would go for that. “Religious freedom” only goes in one direction: whatever misogynistic conservative men want.

Abortion rights are the law of the land. Hobby Lobby’s rejection of abortion rights as against their religious principles is no more valid a reason to deny an employee compensation than any other form of religious discrimination. The Constitution grants the owners of Hobby Lobby to exercise their own religion as they see fit. It doesn’t grant them the right to pay their employees unequally on the basis of their religious beliefs if we’ve passed a law stating that employees have a right to equal compensation (which is what the ACA essentially does.)

One of the huge cultural problems we have is we don’t delineate between sexuality, which is normal and healthy and unfolds over the life cycles, and sexualization, or the hypersexualization of our girls.

—Joyce McFadden, psychoanalyst and author of Your Daughter’s Bedroom: Insights for Raising Confident Women in “My Barbies Had So Much Sex. It Was Great." by Ann Friedman.

(Source: fuckyeahfeminists)

lisafrankocean:

this is still my favorite tweet of all time

lisafrankocean:

this is still my favorite tweet of all time

Sexuality, too, is fluid, and many people seem to struggle with this, to the point of being actively repulsed and confused by the idea that sexual orientation does not necessarily remain consistent throughout someone’s life. This attitude is harmful for those who do experience shifts in their sexual orientations, but it also stifles conversation and exploration, as people who may be confused about their sexuality who receive this kind of messaging may experience harm that takes years to undo—and in some cases, they may never recover, because they are never given an opportunity to learn who they are and be themselves.

Take, for example, the heterosexual woman who later develops an attraction to women, and begins to identify as bisexual or lesbian. She may have experienced this attraction throughout her life and not picked up on it—perhaps she didn’t meet the right woman, or she was living in a repressive environment where homosexuality was not accepted. Or maybe her sexual orientation actively shifted. The attitudes of those around her will be dismissive and unpleasant, as people attempt to erase both her past as a heterosexual and her present as a gay or bi woman.

Though her sexuality has shifted, she remains fundamentally the same woman. Her past history doesn’t magically vanish, and she may even look back on it with fondness or gratitude for the relationships she had. Likewise, people may move through other sexual orientations depending on circumstances, their current stage of life, and other factors; the asexual who later realizes he’s gay, the lesbian woman who develops a bisexual attraction.

Yes, Sexuality Changes, and Yes, That Is Okay

I don’t understand why people get so upset at being told they have privilege.

queenfattyoftherollpalace:

Being privileged doesn’t make you a bad person, denying your privilege does.
Having privilege doesn’t mean that your life is sunshine and rainbows. It means that society favors people like you.
Your personal experiences do not erase your privilege.
Don’t be upset about being told you are privileged, be upset that the things systematically given to you are denied from others.

genericlatino:

praxis89:

Many of us heard this from our parents growing up.


Arguably one of the most inspirational AND disturbing things (was going to say fucked up things) you can tell a child.

genericlatino:

praxis89:

Many of us heard this from our parents growing up.

Arguably one of the most inspirational AND disturbing things (was going to say fucked up things) you can tell a child.

10 Poverty Myths, Busted | Mother Jones

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

rossclements asked: Regarding noodles v pasta. I'd say (being a Brit) that noodles are a type of Asian pasta. Spaghetti etc are not noodles, but are pasta. And so for example, Udon or Ramen noodles are pasta. My flatmates share the same thinking.

english2english:

Good to know. 

I know english2english is primarily UK/US based, but hey. I find the above definition completely wrong. Noodles come from all cultures (udon, soba, ramen, spaghetti, vermicelli etc.) Noodles is the broad category of all long-shaped twirly foods. Pasta is a subset of noodles. Many types of pasta are a subset of noodles, but noodles are not necessarily pasta. 

I also got way too irate about this because I really like food. I even made a shitty venn diagram. 

image

indigenousambition:

It’s so ironic that people are constantly telling me I am “exotic”, because as Native American living the states I am the farthest thing from exotic. I am literally indigenous.